Episode 15 – Linda LaTourelle

Linda has a long history and deep knowledge in Information Technology – she currently works as a manager in a software company for utilities. Throughout her technology career, she implemented the first computer system for one of the utilities she worked for. She has worked on mainframes, networks, servers, virtual servers and taught herself programming before moving into IT management roles. She is an avid hunter and fisherwoman.

Episode Notes

Music used in the podcast: Higher Up, Silverman Sound Studio

Acronyms, Definitions, and Fact Check

Trap Shooting – one of the three major disciplines of competitive clay pigeon shooting (shooting shotguns at clay targets). The other disciplines are skeet shooting and sporting clays. They are distinguished roughly as follows, with variations within each group:

  • In trap shooting, the targets are launched from a single “house” or machine, generally away from the shooter.
  • In skeet shooting, targets are launched from two “houses” in somewhat “sideways” paths that intersect in front of the shooter.
  • Sporting clays includes a more complex course, with many launch points. (wikipedia)

Punch Card Computers – A punch card is a piece of stiff paper that can be used to contain digital data represented by the presence or absence of holes in predefined positions. Digital data can be used for data processing applications or used to directly control automated machinery. Punched cards were widely used through much of the 20th century in the data processing industry, where specialized and increasingly complex unit record machines, organized into semiautomatic data processing systems, used punched cards for data input, output, and storage. The IBM 12-row/80-column punched card format came to dominate the industry. Many early digital computers used punched cards as the primary medium for input of both computer programs and data. (wikipedia)

Mainframe computer – used primarily by large organizations for critical applications; bulk data processing, such as census, industry and consumer statistics, and enterprise resource planning; and transaction processing. (wikipedia)

Server – a piece of computer hardware or software (computer program) that provides functionality for other programs or devices, called “clients“. This architecture is called the client–server model. Servers can provide various functionalities, often called “services”, such as sharing data or resources among multiple clients, or performing computation for a client. A single server can serve multiple clients, and a single client can use multiple servers. A client process may run on the same device or may connect over a network to a server on a different device. Typical servers are database serversfile serversmail serversprint serversweb serversgame servers, and application servers. (wikipedia)

VMware – VMware provides cloud computing and virtualization software and services. It was one of the first commercially successful companies to virtualize the x86 architecture. (wikipedia)

DSL – Digital Subscriber Line – a family of technologies used to transmit digital data over telephone lines. In telecommunications marketing, the term DSL is widely understood to mean asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL), the most commonly installed DSL technology, for Internet access. DSL service can be delivered simultaneously with wired telephone service on the same telephone line since DSL uses higher frequency bands for data. On the customer premises, a DSL filter on each non-DSL outlet blocks any high-frequency interference to enable simultaneous use of the voice and DSL services. (wikipedia)

Cooperative Principles –

  • Open and Voluntary Membership
  • Democratic Member Control
  • Members’ Economic Participation
  • Autonomy and Independence
  • Education, Training, and Information
  • Cooperation Among Cooperatives
  • Concern for Community (www.nreca.coop)

Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) – The FMLA went into effect in January 1993. The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave. Eligible employees are entitled to:

  • Twelve workweeks of leave in a 12-month period for:
    • the birth of a child and to care for the newborn child within one year of birth;
    • the placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care and to care for the newly placed child within one year of placement;
    • to care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition;
    • a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job;
    • any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is a covered military member on “covered active duty;” or 
  • Twenty-six workweeks of leave during a single 12-month period to care for a covered servicemember with a serious injury or illness if the eligible employee is the servicemember’s spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin (military caregiver leave). (https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/fmla)

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